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Free Vin Check, Get Vehicle History Report, Free Car History, Used Car History, Auto History, Free Vehicle History, VIN Number Check, Car History, Lemon, Check - Car History Year 1935


Car History Year 1935
Date: Sunday, September 26 @ 23:18:25 UTC
Topic: Cars


Sometimes the past can come back and hit you in the face, reminding you that it's all been done before. To use an automotive analogy, it's like looking in the rear view mirror and seeing that engraved message warning that "objects may be closer than they seem." Since Chrysler introduced the Plymouth Voyager and Dodge Caravan in 1984, minivans, MPVs or "people movers" have become some of the biggest selling models of the Nineties and nearly every manufacturer has an example. But look at the Stout Scarab of 1935, read the specification and marvel at how farsighted was its creator William B. Stout.

While the Scarab was influenced by his pioneering work on all-metal aircraft, Stout's background also included automotive jobs. His first taste of car design was in 1913 when he was an editor on Motor Age, but his proposed cyclecar never made it into production due to lack of finance. Stout had better luck with the Imp cyclecar when he was general sales manager for Mclntyre, but that was a commercial failure and he moved to Scripps-Booth at the end of 1914 where he was chief engineer. That position was also brief, and in 1916 he joined the aircraft division of Packard. All his life, Stout was a prolific inventor (he filed more patents than anyone else except Thomas Edison) and he introduced the internally-braced, cantilevered all-metal wing and corrugated aluminum outer skin to American aviation. Stout also had a gift for self-promotion, as shown by a letter he sent to Detroit industrialists, to raise money for a project, which said: "We want to build a metal plane. If you join us it will cost money. One thousand dollars. No more, no less. And for your thousand dollars you will get one definite promise. You will never get your money back." But it was joining forces with Henry and Edsel Ford that really got things going. The Fords built Stout a new facility in Dearborn, Michigan, and the Stout Metal Airplane Co was established as a division of The Ford Motor Company. The result was the 2-AT, the first all-metal aircraft built in the USA, which had exceptional load carrying capabilities, in 1925, Henry Ford decided to buy out William Stout's share of the company, and Stout became the head of an independent airline while still developing aircraft. Stout Air Services operated Ford 4-AT Tri-Motor airliners, and was the first airline to offer in-flight meais (sandwiches and coffee) and employ uniformed Flight Escorts. Stout's aircrew also wore the company uniforms of blue trimmed with gold braid, a suggestion by Henry Ford that it would "lend dignity to their profession." Stout sold his airline to the newly-formed United Airlines and turned his mind to other things. In 1932, he started Stout Engineering Laboratories in Detroit where he built the first Scarab prototype. It wasn't until 1935, however, that he deemed the Scarab was ready for production when he introduced a second, steel-bodied version (the original had a duraluminum alloy body). Everything about the Scarab was unusual - unit construction and streamlined in shape, it had a rear-mounted 85hp Ford V8 coupled to a transaxle/differential unit modified from a three-speed transmission, plus coil spring suspension all round. The Scarab interior was equally unorthodox: in a huge 7ft Gins by 5ft 7ins floor area, only the driver's seat was fixed, the others were loose to enable them to be moved to any position. A folding table was provided for eating or playing cards and there was a rear davenport seat which converted into a full-length couch. One magazine described the Scarab's cabin thus: "The interior of the car is extremely comfortable and roomy, with a table and movable chairs. It gives passengers the feeling of traveling in a hotel room." A very few cars were actually produced, and mainly offered "by invitation to a selected list." A couple probably ended up with movie stars but the main drawback of the car in terms of appealing to a mass market - or even to a specialist market - was that it was - let's face it - no oil-painting. Specification STOUT SCARAB Engine Ford: 90 degree V8 - cast iron Displacement 221cu. ins Bore and stroke 3 1/16 x 3 3/4ins. Horsepower 85 Body styles Unique & Unitary No. of seats 4+ with adaptable layout Weight (lbs) - Price - Produced 5     Specification FORD DELUXE PHAETON Engine Ford: 90 degree V8 - cast iron Displacement 221 cu. ins Bore and stroke 3 1/16 x 3 3/4ins. Horsepower 85 Body styles 4 door convertible No. of seats 4 Weight (lbs) 2,667 lbs Price $580 Produced 6,073     Specification AUBURN SPEEDSTER Engine Cast iron - 8 cylinders in line Displacement 322 cu. ins Bore and stroke 3.06 x 4.75 ins. Horsepower 132 Body styles Open sports No. of seats 2 Weight (lbs) 3,706 lbs Price $2,245 Produced 500  





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